Lung Cancer Articles A-Z

Abnormal Scars and Lobectomy - Cause of Lung Cancer

This page contains links to eMedTV Lung Cancer Articles containing information on subjects from Abnormal Scars and Lobectomy to Cause of Lung Cancer. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Abnormal Scars and Lobectomy
    After your lobectomy, you will have a large scar on your chest. As this eMedTV page explains, abnormal scars sometimes occur, but their appearance has nothing to do with the outcome of the surgery. This page discusses abnormal scars and lobectomy.
  • Abnormal Scars and Pneumonectomy
    Some people are prone to abnormal scars, and a pneumonectomy will produce a scar, so this can happen. As this eMedTV article explains, however, these scars, called keloids, are not an indication of the results of your surgery.
  • Air Leak Following Lobectomy
    After your lobectomy, your lung will probably leak air for a few days. As this page of the eMedTV site explains, an air leak following lobectomy occurs in the area that the tissue was cut away, and usually stops leaking once it heals.
  • Alimta
    Alimta is a type of chemotherapy used to treat mesothelioma and non-squamous, non-small-cell lung cancer. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this medication, including how it is administered, possible side effects, safety precautions, and more.
  • Alimta and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Alimta (pemetrexed) does not recommend breastfeeding while taking it. This eMedTV segment offers more information on nursing while taking this chemotherapy drug, including why it's important to discuss the matter with your doctor.
  • Alimta and Hair Loss
    In one study, up to 7 percent of people using Alimta experienced hair loss as a side effect. This eMedTV Web article discusses the likelihood of losing your hair while taking this chemotherapy drug, with information on what to do if it happens to you.
  • Alimta and Pregnancy
    The FDA considers Alimta (pemetrexed) a pregnancy Category D drug. As this eMedTV page explains, this means that it should be avoided during pregnancy unless the benefits clearly outweigh any risks. This page also describes the results of animal studies.
  • Alimta Chemotherapy Information
    People with certain types of lung cancer may be given a chemotherapy drug called Alimta. This eMedTV segment offers more information on Alimta, including some of its possible side effects, things to be aware of before starting treatment, and more.
  • Alimta Dosage
    Alimta is administered as an infusion (injection) that takes about 10 minutes. As this eMedTV resource explains, this dose of Alimta is typically given every 21 days. This article talks in greater detail about when and how this drug is given.
  • Alimta Drug Interactions
    Probenecid, Daypro, and Advil are some of the products that can cause Alimta drug interactions. This eMedTV page discusses this topic in detail, listing other medicines that can react with the chemotherapy drug and describing the problems that can occur.
  • Alimta Overdose
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, an Alimta (pemetrexed) overdose could cause problems such as low blood platelets and a rash. This article takes a closer look at the effects of this type of overdose, as well as available treatment options.
  • Alimta Side Effects
    If you are taking Alimta, you may experience fatigue, loss of appetite, or a number of other side effects. This eMedTV selection offers a detailed list of both common and serious Alimta side effects and includes information on how to reduce your risk.
  • Alimta Uses
    Alimta is approved as a chemotherapy drug for mesothelioma and another type of cancer. This eMedTV Web page covers these Alimta uses in detail, describing how it works and explaining whether it is approved for use in children and teens.
  • Alimta Warnings and Precautions
    Alimta can decrease the ability of bone marrow to produce blood cells. As this eMedTV page explains, this can increase your risk of anemia and bleeding. This article covers various warnings and precautions for Alimta, including who should avoid it.
  • Alitma
    As a chemotherapy drug, Alimta is used to treat mesothelioma and non-squamous, non-small-cell lung cancer. This eMedTV resource briefly describes the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Alitma is a common misspelling of Alimta.
  • Alternative Lung Cancer Treatment
    Some people find alternative lung cancer treatment to be helpful in reducing side effects and symptoms. This eMedTV Web page looks at these options, such acupuncture and herbal products, and offers a list of questions to ask about such treatment.
  • Alternatives to Nicorette Gum
    This eMedTV Web page describes some of the alternatives to Nicorette Gum (nicotine gum), including the nicotine patch, Zyban, and behavioral therapy. This article takes a closer look at a variety of options available to help people stop smoking.
  • Anesthesia for Lobectomy
    The general anesthesia that is used for a lobectomy puts you into a deep sleep. As this eMedTV page explains, this keeps you from feeling any pain or pressure during the surgery. This page discusses the different types of anesthesia for lobectomy.
  • Anesthesia for Pneumonectomy
    Anesthesia for pneumonectomy is used to keep you from feeling pain or movement during the surgery. This eMedTV Web page explains the different types of anesthesia, how is it administered, and possible side effects and complications that can occur.
  • Asbestas
    Asbestos is the name for a group of minerals that naturally occur as bundles of fibers. This eMedTV page describes asbestos in more detail and lists health problems that can occur with asbestos exposure. Asbestas is a common misspelling of asbestos.
  • Asbestes
    Asbestos is a group of minerals that are easily broken down and can be inhaled or swallowed. This eMedTV Web page explains where these minerals are found and explores the risks of asbestos exposure. Asbestes is a common misspelling of asbestos.
  • Asbestoes
    Asbestos is defined as a group of minerals that occur naturally as bundles of fibers. This eMedTV page explores the health risks associated with asbestos exposure and explains who is at risk for exposure. Asbestoes is a common misspelling of asbestos.
  • Asbestos
    Asbestos is a group of minerals used in insulation and other materials (such as brake shoes). As this eMedTV article explains, frequent exposure to it can cause health problems, such as lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis.
  • Asbestose
    Asbestos exposure can lead to serious health problems, such as lung cancer or mesothelioma. This eMedTV resource explains what asbestos is used for and why it can be easily inhaled or swallowed. Asbestose is a common misspelling of asbestos.
  • Asbestoses
    Regular exposure to asbestos can lead to mesothelioma, lung cancer, and other cancers. This eMedTV article explains what asbestos is and describes some of the symptoms of asbestos-related diseases. Asbestoses is a common misspelling of asbestos.
  • Bleeding With a Lobectomy
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, some bleeding with a lobectomy is normal. Uncontrollable bleeding, however, can be very serious, and it may require a blood transfusion or another surgery. This page discusses bleeding following lobectomy.
  • Bleeding With a Pneumonectomy
    If uncontrollable, bleeding with a pneumonectomy can be serious, but it's normal for some bleeding to occur. This eMedTV Web page explains measures doctors take if the bleeding becomes serious or doesn't stop, such as blood transfusions.
  • Blood Clots Following a Lobectomy
    It is possible to have blood clots following a lobectomy, especially if you have had blood clots before. This eMedTV segment highlights the different types of blood clots that can occur after a lobectomy, such as a deep vein thrombosis.
  • Blood Clots Following a Pneumonectomy
    Blood clots following a pneumonectomy are possible, especially if you have a history of this. This eMedTV resource highlights the different possible types of blood clots, like a pulmonary embolus, the risks they present, and how they are treated.
  • Britney Spears
    After being scrutinized for smoking tobacco cigarettes too close to her children, Britney Spears can now be spotted using the e-cigs. Britney has publicly reported that it was electronic cigarettes that have allowed her to take control of her life and finally "win" her battle against the habit.
  • Bronchopleural Fistulas and Lobectomy
    As this eMedTV page explains, a bronchopleural fistula after a lobectomy may result in fever, breathing difficulties, and coughing up blood. This portion of the Web site offers more information on bronchopleural fistulas and lobectomy.
  • Bronchopleural Fistulas and Pneumonectomy
    As this eMedTV page explains, there is a link between bronchopleural fistulas and pneumonectomy, in that after the surgery, fluid or air can get into the space in your chest. Symptoms include fever, difficulty breathing, and coughing up blood.
  • Bruno Mars
    In an effort to quit smoking for his mother, Bruno Mars not only switched to using e-cigs but also signed up as an investor to financially back NJOY, an electronic cigarette company. On Mother's Day, he started using NJOY's e-cigs to kick the habit.
  • Can Nicorette Gum Cause Me to Have a Sore Throat?
    Using Nicorette Gum can cause some people to have a sore throat. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses this potential side effect, including when this reaction may require medical care. This article also links to more details on this topic.
  • Can You Chew Nicorette Gum for Many Years?
    This eMedTV Web page describes the potential problems that can occur if you chew Nicorette Gum for many years. This article gives an overview of using this product for more than 12 weeks and links to more detailed information on the topic.
  • Can You Chew Nicorette While Pregnant?
    Using Nicorette Gum while pregnant may not be safe for a developing fetus. This article from the eMedTV Web library provides more details on whether pregnant women can chew Nicorette Gum, including potential risks of nicotine exposure in a fetus.
  • Can You Use a Nicotine Patch and Lozenge Together?
    If you use a nicotine patch and nicotine lozenge together, it could cause a nicotine overdose. This eMedTV article describes some of the effects of a nicotine overdose, such as nausea, vomiting, and dizziness. A link to more details is also included.
  • Can You Use Nicotine Lozenges While Pregnant?
    Using nicotine lozenges while pregnant may not be safe for an unborn child. This selection from the eMedTV Web archives offers more details on whether pregnant women can use nicotine lozenges, including potential risks of nicotine exposure in a fetus.
  • Cancer and Etopophos
    Etopophos is a chemotherapy drug used in the treatment of certain types of lung or testicular cancer. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at how Etopophos can treat cancers such as these and how this chemotherapy medicine is administered.
  • Cancer and Iressa
    As described in this page from the eMedTV Web library, Iressa is licensed to treat non-small cell lung cancer in adults. This article describes how this drug works and covers general dosing information. It also links to more details on this topic.
  • Cancer and Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride
    By damaging DNA in the cells, mechlorethamine hydrochloride can help treat certain types of cancer. This eMedTV article examines specific uses of this drug, with details on how the drug works and potential side effects. It also links to more details.
  • Cancer and Navelbine
    Adults who have non-small cell lung cancer may benefit from chemotherapy treatment with Navelbine. This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at how this anticancer medicine works, possible off-label uses, and more.
  • Cancer and Toposar
    A chemotherapy medication, Toposar is used to help treat certain types of cancer. This eMedTV Web selection describes specific uses of this drug, including details on how it works. It also links to more information.
  • Cancer Drug Iressa
    A doctor may prescribe Iressa to treat non-small cell lung cancer. This eMedTV Web selection takes a look at this anticancer drug, with details on how Iressa works and when it is prescribed. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Cause of Lung Cancer
    While tobacco is probably the leading cause of lung cancer, other factors can contribute to its development. This eMedTV resource takes a brief look at the various causes of this disease, with a link to a more detailed article on this topic.
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